How do you want to login to your MUCH account?

Don't have an account? Sign up now.

Reset Password.

You can opt-out from either of these at any time

Any questions or concerns please contact us.

loading
X

Please update your browser to get the best experience

The Many Faces Of Nunavut

Today, 37,000 people live in Nunavut. Many of the residents are temporary government workers, researchers, or labourers. An ariel view of Iqaluit will reveal that there aren’t any roads leading out from the capital city, only being connected to the rest of Canada via plane or ship. Thus, Nunavut is one of the most remote, sparsely settled regions in the world. With that being said, Nunavut displays much of the diversity you would expect of a province or territory in Canada. Stop signs are in three languages, English, French, and Inuktitut. While many Inuit residents have thousands of years of family history in the region, many of Nunavut’s population have unique reasons for why they call the territory home. Here are some of the many faces of Nunavut.

 

Nunavut has been the centre of renowned exploration for thousands of years. The region has had a continuous population for around 4000 years and is featured in the Norse sagas. The first contact of European settlers and explorers was in 1450 but written accounts begin in 1576 with English explorer Martin Frobisher. Exploration and adventure opportunities in Nunavut are still incredibly abundant. Pictured is Dog sledding guide and owner of Inukpak Outfitting, Louis Philippe Pothier.

Nunavut has been the centre of renowned exploration for thousands of years. The region has had a continuous population for around 4000 years and is featured in the Norse sagas. The first contact with European settlers and explorers was in 1450 but written accounts begin in 1576 with English explorer Martin Frobisher. Exploration and adventure opportunities in Nunavut are still incredibly abundant. Pictured is Roposie Alivaktuq an adventure guide in Pangnirtung.

Pictured is sled dog guide, Kevin Sudlovenick. While there are roads in Nunavut, there isn’t a cohesive network from region to region. As a result, ATV’s, snowmobiles, planes, and boats are the most common forms of travel in Canada’s north. But at one time, dog sleds were the most popular form of travel and human habitation of arctic regions may have not been possible without it. At one time there were many dog breeds specifically adapted to polar temperatures. Today, sled dogging is still a popular recreational activity in Nunavut.

Pictured is sled dog guide, Kevin Sudlovenick. While there are roads in Nunavut, there isn’t a cohesive network from region to region. As a result, ATV’s, snowmobiles, planes, and boats are the most common forms of travel in Canada’s north. But at one time, dog sleds were the most popular form of travel and human habitation of arctic regions may have not been possible without it. At one time there were many dog breeds specifically adapted to polar temperatures. Today, sled dogging is still a popular recreational activity in Nunavut.

Parks Canada plays an important role in educating visitors on the geography of Nunavut. Ambassadors of the region, such as Billy Etooangat (pictured), who works in communication visitor services at Parks Canada in Nunavut, are vital to understanding and navigating Nunavut’s wild spaces. At over two million square kilometres, Nunavut is Canada’s largest territory. More than half of the region is comprised of islands and most of the land mass is surfaced with Arctic tundra. Only the most resilient northern animals, such as caribou, muskox, and polar bear, inhabit the area. With such a rugged and unique landscape, Nunavut is home to some of the most remote and challenging climates and landscapes in Canada, but if navigated appropriately, it is a region that can provide unparalleled scenery and once-in-a-lifetime adventure.

Parks Canada plays an important role in educating visitors on the geography of Nunavut. Ambassadors of the region, such as Billy Etooangat (pictured), who works in communication visitor services at Parks Canada in Nunavut, are vital to understanding and navigating Nunavut’s wild spaces. With such a rugged and unique landscape, Nunavut is home to some of the most remote and challenging climates and landscapes in Canada, but if navigated appropriately, it is a region that can provide unparalleled scenery and once-in-a-lifetime adventure.

Pictured are throat singers, Teresa Qiatsuq and Alexia Galloway-Alainga. Inuit throat singing or “katajjaq,” is a form of musical performance among the Inuit. Performers typically sing only in duets, in something akin to a contest, attempting to outlast the other. Originally created as a form of entertainment among Inuit women, it was once regarded as just a type of vocal or breathing game in the Inuit culture. Today throat singing is performed as a musical performance, and throat singers often collaborate with popular non-throat singing musicians.

Pictured are throat singers, Teresa Qiatsuq and Alexia Galloway-Alainga. Inuit throat singing or “katajjaq,” is a form of musical performance among the Inuit. Performers typically sing only in duets, in something akin to a contest, attempting to outlast the other. Today throat singing is performed as a musical performance and throat singers often collaborate with popular non-throat singing musicians.

Latest Posts